Introducing Intent Engine 1.0.0

For larger sites, or for sites where one page can have multiple meanings, quite often the user’s intention can when visiting a specific page can be key. I’ve seen this pattern with a few projects, and during a slow afternoon, built a small script to build the structure for a site to respond to different user intents. A few months later, and after learning a little about hybrid mobile apps, I decided to rewrite this script and expand it to a more full JavaScript library.

Intent Engine provides a framework for developers to easily determine and act on user intents within websites and apps.

Intent Engine uses query components to easily integrate with existing websites and apps. This allows products to communicate with the engine what the user wants in a simple and standard manner. In addition, Intent Engine offers an optional page system, designed specifically for hybrid mobile apps. This system allows developers to merge pages and views into less files, and optimize for PWA standards.

While the 1.0.0 release is complete and available for download, I’m working to find ways to streamline the functionality of the library, and add new features to improve the experience for websites, web apps, and hyrbid mobile apps.

For developers that may choose to integrate Intent Engine with a project, please don’t hesitate to reach out with feedback and suggestions, or submit a pull request on GitHub. I’d love to hear about how Intent Engine can be improved.

Intent Engine has been released under the GNU General Public License v3, and is available for review, download, and forking on GitHub.

Introducing ModalKit 1.0.0

After seeing a need to generate modals on the fly in several projects, I decided that it was time to write a library. Ideally, my vision was to make it easy to “inject” a modal into a page without having to store it in a page’s source code. Out of this vision came ModalKit.

ModalKit is an easy way to generate and display standardized modals on the fly.

ModalKit’s functionality is event-driven, and its first release offers a respectable range of options to make it versatile. ModalKit features a templating system built atop the Handlebars templating library, and timeout options to allow modals to dismiss themselves automatically. For developers that work with modals often, or may want a better way to trigger and manipulate modals, this library is for you.

As I’ve wrapped up the 1.0.0 release, I’ve already started working on integrating ModalKit with projects. I’m a big believer in eating your own dog food. In the coming weeks, you’ll find ModalKit integrated with the DRC site, specifically the Work page. Though the first release is now live, development is only beginning. On the radar are optimizations to the installation process, as well as new ways to present modals.

For developers that may choose to integrate ModalKit with a project, please don’t hesitate to reach out with feedback and suggestions, or submit a pull request on GitHub. I’d love to hear about how ModalKit can be improved.

ModalKit has been released under the GNU General Public License v3, and is available for review, download, and forking on GitHub.